Monday, November 30, 2015

Online Resource Grants For Faculty

Online Resource Grants

The purpose of the online  resource grants is to enable the purchasing of larger one-time online resources no one department can easily afford with its library allocation. In academic year 2015-2016, $160,000 is budgeted for such online collections.
One-time purchases typically include but are not limited to primary source databases, journal backfile collections, e-book collections, audio or streaming media collections. Some possibilities are listed on our one-time resource page. Please contact Scott Pope (pope@txstate.edu) to get pricing for any products outside this list. Acquisitions will verify eligibility and pricing, and can set up trials as needed.

Guidelines

  • The resource should be online, accessible by the entire campus, and come with persistent access rights. The review committee can make an exception for an extraordinary print/microform collection not available online.
  • The resource must  be a one-time purchase. Grant funds cannot be used to support ongoing subscriptions or temporary access to a subscription resource. If the resource requires an annual access fee, the requestor’s department or other department will need to approve the ongoing cost from their library allocation.
  • The resource should enhance the library collection and strengthen research initiatives.
  • All things being equal, priority is given to higher ticket items over inexpensive ones. The library may be able to purchase less expensive items with end-of-year funds.

Review Criteria

  • Value/Anticipated Use of the Resource: Priority is given to resources that benefit many departments or programs or greatly benefit one area. More than one source of personal/departmental support may be important. The resource does not necessarily need to be multi-disciplinary. The intent is that all subject areas be represented over the years.
  • Uniqueness: Priority is given to resources that enhance the library’s collection rather than duplicate or overlap with existing collections.

Submit a proposal here

Submission deadline: Thursday, February 18, 2016, 5pm.

Applications received after the deadline will not be considered.
The review committee consists of two members of the Library Committee, two previous recipients, and two librarians.

Timeline

Dec 8 – Feb 19: Applications are accepted
Feb 19 – March 13: Application review
End of March: Grants are announced
April – May: Resources are ordered

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Dun & Bradstreet Is Inside Mergent

The Dun & Bradstreet Private Company database is lurking inside the Mergent database. 

Once you get inside Mergent, you'll clearly see the correct tab. Most people use this to look up a private company's estimated annual sales.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Searching For SEC Documents

Update: the Morningstar 10-K database is going away.  No big deal it searched publicly accessible SEC documents anyway.

So here are your two best options.

You can search the official EDGAR database.

You can use our database Mergent and select government filings as the search option.  I prefer the search interface on Mergent.





Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Treaties


Here are some ways to find out which countries have signed what kind of treaties. Also, bear in mind that membership in international organizations de facto carries some kinds of agreements and cooperation (i.e. European Union).

on the internet:

Organization of American States Free Trade Agreements

U.S. Free Trade Agreements

GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade). Avoid www.gatt.org, one of the most famous protest sites on the internet.

UN Database of Treaties - All treaties entered into by any member state.

CIA World Factbook - see which international organizations a country belongs to. Choose your country and click on government to the bottom of the screen.

Treaties in Force - Treaties America has signed.

our databases:

Search Lexis Nexis for the full text of lapsed and current U.S. Treaties.  They also have the European Union treaties.
 
In Lexis Nexis, go to 1) International Legal Tab then 2) European Union, Commonwealth and Foreign Nations Tab (even for US treaties) 3) choose your selection from the box.

see below:


Sunday, November 1, 2015

Wall Street Journal

Here's how you find the Wall Street Journal. You could get a paper copy on the third floor in periodicals. The most recent edition is kept at the periodicals desk.

Or, you can read the Journal online in ABI Inform. You can browse a daily edition by setting the date to one day only.

Older editions (1889-1995) are available fulltext online at ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

Here's a complete list of our Wall Street Journal links.