Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Alfred Marshall, Early Theorist Of Economic Development


All Alfred Marshall books here. 

From Gale:


The English economist Alfred Marshall (1842-1924) was the founder of the "new economics." He rejected the traditional definition of economics as the "science of wealth" to establish a discipline concerned with social welfare.

In 1890 Marshall's Principles of Economics was welcomed enthusiastically by economists and a popular audience as a revolutionary work in economics.

The content and method of Marshall's economics were largely original, but his basic assumptions were derived from the 19th-century belief that social reform depended initially upon the reform of character. He never doubted that every man sought his own, or at least his children's, best interest; that "work" purified human nature, stimulating personal and social progress; or that capitalism would be inherently progressive if it was made more efficient.

What Do P/E Ratios Really Mean?

Taken from p. 143 of Active Value Investing, the classic book from Vitaliy N. Katsenelson.

P/E (price per earning) refers to the amount of money stock investors are willing to pay for the stock as reflected in its stock price. First, determine how much the company is earning per share. Then check the stock price. Divide the current stock price by the earnings per share number. You have the P/E ratio!

So is a high P/E a good or bad sign? Depends.

A new growth stock will typically show much higher P/E ratios than an established company. Once a company stops growing rapidly, the P/E ratio will actually decline. 

Katsenelson quotes the legendary Benjamin Graham as giving a P/E figure of around 8 as about right for a company with solid fundamentals but low growth.

Katsenelson includes a cool chart on p.143 that shows appropriate levels of P/E in relation to expected levels of growth.

Thursday, November 20, 2014

dataZoa Makes Big Data Easy

The Library is pleased to bring you a new platform to manage your statistics, data and create custom graphs.


The perfect tool for the age of big data, dataZoa has multidisciplinary utility and is user friendly.

Many different statistical series may be imported into dataZoa from the web. Simply install dataZoa, look for the dataZoa icon and get started!



dataZoa lets you: • import statistics from dataZoa friendly web sites, such as the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Census and many more. • create graphs that continually update • customize graph & table parameters

Getting dataZoa: You may install dataZoa by going to http://www.dataZoa.com/ and providing your Texas State credentials.


Thursday, November 13, 2014

Finding International Statistics @ Alkek


The video explains how to find economic and development stats for many different countries worldwide on:

GDP, employment, military expenditures, research and development, wages, industry composition, the environment, capital investment, and many more statistics.

Marketline
Passport

Friday, November 7, 2014

Impact Factor 2: Journals Ranked By Field


In an earlier post we talked about how to get the impact factor of individual journals.  Here’s how you find out the most influential journals by field.  Once you get into this section of citation analysis, you’ll intuitively see how to rank by most influential authors, institutions, conference proceedings and so on.  Have fun.

Go to an ISI Citation Analysis database (different ones for different disciplines). Choose Journal Citation Reports at the top.


Wednesday, November 5, 2014

TV Ratings - Including Cable

Need to find out the current ratings for popular network and cable tv shows?

The best one is Nielsen weekly ratings from Zap2It. It also includes the top cable shows.

Rating Intelligence - looks OK, but most content is for subscribers.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Vemma Drink Biz Model Controversy

From Rolling Stone:
 
"Vemma is the latest mutation of an American invention. Multilevel marketing began in the middle of the past century with one company, a predecessor of Amway. The idea was simple: Instead of just selling a product, you could recruit people to sell it, too. Then, when they made a sale, you both shared in the profit. Recruiting soon became a lot more profitable than merely selling, a shift in incentives that produced a first in American consumerism: Suddenly the pitch was more important than the product. In some cases it wasn't necessary to even have a product. For some 50 years, lawmakers, consumer advocates and lobbying groups have argued over whether this unique setup constitutes a legitimate business or something more sinister, like an illegal pyramid scheme"